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   Index



 

ORCHIDACEAE

(Orchid family)

 

17,000 species in 735 genera are of cosmopolitan distribution, abundant in the tropics but rare in Arctic regions.

[Summary yet to be added]


Aerangis fastuosa (Rchb.f.) Schltr.
[syn. Angraecum fastuosum Rchb.f.]
Magnificent Aerangis

Aerangis Fastuosa Callus Powder [INCI; of uncertain composition (see Schmidt 2017)], is a recognised cosmetic product ingredient purported to have skin conditioning properties (Standing Committee on Cosmetic Products 2019, CosIng 2023/4).



Anacamptis morio (L.) R.M.Bateman, Pridgeon & M.W.Chase
[syn. Orchis morio L.]
Green-Veined Orchid, Green Winged Orchid, Kleines Knabenkraut

Orchis Morio Flower Extract [INCI; CAS RN 91770-44-4; of uncertain composition (see Schmidt 2017)],a is a recognised cosmetic product ingredient purported to have soothing properties (Standing Committee on Cosmetic Products 2019, CosIng 2023/4).



Anoectochilus formosanus Hayata
Formosa Anoectochilus, Jewel Orchid, Taiwan Jewel Orchid

Anoectochilus Formosanus Cell Culture Extract, Anoectochilus Formosanus Extract, and Anoectochilus Formosanus Shoot [INCI; all of uncertain composition (see Schmidt 2017)], are recognised cosmetic product ingredients purported variously to have emollient, humectant, and skin conditioning properties (Standing Committee on Cosmetic Products 2019, CosIng 2023/4).



Aplectrum hyemale (Muhl. ex Willd.) Torr.
[syns Corallorhiza hyemalis (Muhl. ex Willd.) Nutt., Cymbidium hyemale Muhl. ex Willd.]
Adam and Eve, Puttyroot, Aplectrelle d'Hiver

[Information available but not yet included in database]



Bletilla formosana (Hayata) Schltr.
[syns Bletia formosana Hayata, Bletilla kotoensis (Hayata) Schltr., Bletilla szetschuanica Schltr., Jimensia szetschuanica (Schltr.) Garay & R.E.Schult.]
Taiwan Ground Orchid

Bletilla Formosana Callus Extract and Bletilla Formosana Tuber Extract [INCI; both of uncertain composition (see Schmidt 2017)], are recognised cosmetic product ingredients purported to have antioxidant properties (Standing Committee on Cosmetic Products 2019, CosIng 2023/4).



Bletilla striata (Thunb.) Rchb.f.
[syns Bletia hyacinthina (Sm.) Aiton, Limodorum striatum Thunb.]
Chinese Ground Orchid, Hardy Orchid, Hyacinth Bletilla, Hyacinth Orchid, Urn Orchid

Bletia Hyacinthina Bulb Extract [INCI; CAS RN 223748-10-5], and Bletilla Striata Callus Extract, Bletilla Striata Callus Powder, Bletilla Striata Root Extract, Bletilla Striata Root Powder, Bletilla Striata Root Water, and Bletilla Striata Root/Stalk Powder [INCI; all of uncertain composition (see Schmidt 2017)], are recognised cosmetic product ingredients variously purported to have abrasive, antioxidant, antimicrobial, humectant, perfuming, skin conditioning, and skin protecting properties (Standing Committee on Cosmetic Products 2019, CosIng 2023/4).

[Further information available but not yet included in database]



Calanthe discolor Lindl.
Two-Coloured Calanthe

Calanthe Discolor Extract [INCI; of uncertain composition (see Schmidt 2017)], is a recognised cosmetic product ingredient purported to have skin conditioning properties (Standing Committee on Cosmetic Products 2019, CosIng 2023/4).



Cattleya bicalhoi Van den Berg
[syns Hadrolaelia dayana (Rchb.f.) Chiron & V.P.Castro, Laelia dayana Rchb.f., Sophronitis dayana Van den Berg & M.W.Chase]
Day's Laelia

Sophronitis Dayana Callus Extract [INCI; of uncertain composition (see Schmidt 2017)], is a recognised cosmetic product ingredient purported to have hair conditioning and skin conditioning/emollient properties (Standing Committee on Cosmetic Products 2019, CosIng 2023/4).



Coryanthes speciosa Hook.
[syns Coryanthes maculata var. punctata Lindl., Coryanthes punctata Beer, Epidendrum galeatum Vell., Gongora speciosa (Hook.) Hook.]
Bat Orchid, Bucket Orchid

[Information available but not yet included in database]



Cycnoches cooperi Rolfe
[syn. Cycnoches pentadactylon var. cooperi (Rolfe) Pabst]
Cooper's Cycnoches

Cycnoches Cooperi Extract and Cycnoches Cooperi Flower/Leaf Extract [INCI; both of uncertain composition (see Schmidt 2017)], are recognised cosmetic product ingredients purported to have antioxidant, emollient, and skin conditioning properties (Standing Committee on Cosmetic Products 2019, CosIng 2023/4).



Cymbidium erythraeum Lindl.
[syn. Cymbidium hennisianum Schltr.]
Indian Cymbidium, Red-Spotted Lip Cymbidium

Cymbidium Erythraeum Flower Extract [INCI; of uncertain composition (see Schmidt 2017)], is a recognised cosmetic product ingredient purported to have antioxidant, humectant, skin conditioning, and skin protecting properties (Standing Committee on Cosmetic Products 2019, CosIng 2023/4).



Cymbidium goeringii (Rchb.f.) Rchb.f.
[syns Cymbidium virescens Lindl., Maxillaria goeringii Rchb.f.]
Noble Orchid, Riverstream Orchid

Cymbidium Goeringii Extract [INCI; of uncertain composition (see Schmidt 2017)], is a recognised cosmetic product ingredient purported to have antioxidant, astringent, hair conditioning, humectant, skin conditioning, and skin protecting properties (Standing Committee on Cosmetic Products 2019, CosIng 2023/4).



Cymbidium Great Flower
Cymbidium Great Flower is an orchid hybrid (an 8th generation grex) originated in 1985 from the cross Cymbidium Great Waltz × Cymbidium Valley Flower.a,b

Cymbidium Great Flower Bulb Extract, Cymbidium Great Flower Extract, Cymbidium Great Flower Flower/Stem Extract, Cymbidium Great Flower Flower/Stem Water, Cymbidium Great Flower Leaf Extract, Cymbidium Great Flower Leaf Powder, and Cymbidium Great Flower Stem Extract [INCI; all of uncertain composition (see Schmidt 2017)], are recognised cosmetic product ingredients purported to have emollient, hair conditioning, humectant, and skin conditioning properties (Standing Committee on Cosmetic Products 2019, CosIng 2023/4). The particular cultivar Cymbidium Great Flower ‘Marie Laurencin’ is the subject of a Japanese Patent describing a "hair growth / restoration agent".c,d



Cymbidium hookerianum Rchb.f.
[syn. Cymbidium grandiflorum Griff.]
Hooker's Cymbidium

Cymbidium Grandiflorum Flower Extract and Cymbidium Grandiflorum Root Extract [INCI; both of uncertain composition (see Schmidt 2017)], are recognised cosmetic product ingredients purported to have humectant, skin conditioning properties (Standing Committee on Cosmetic Products 2019, CosIng 2023/4).



Cymbidium kanran Makino
[syn. Cymbidium oreophilum Hayata]
Cold-Growing Cymbidium, Winter Orchid

Cymbidium Kanran Extract [INCI; of uncertain composition (see Schmidt 2017)], is a recognised cosmetic product ingredient purported to have antioxidant, astringent, emollient, and skin conditioning (Standing Committee on Cosmetic Products 2019, CosIng 2023/4).



Cymbidium lancifolium Hook.
[syn. Cymbidium nagifolium Masam.]
Lance-Leafed Cymbidium, Spoon Leaf Orchid

Cymbidium Lancifolium Extract [INCI; of uncertain composition (see Schmidt 2017)], is a recognised cosmetic product ingredient purported to have antioxidant, astringent, emollient, and skin conditioning (Standing Committee on Cosmetic Products 2019, CosIng 2023/4).



Cymbidium Lucky Flower
Cymbidium Lucky Flower is an orchid hybrid (grex) originated in 1984 from the cross Cymbidium Lucky Kawano × Cymbidium Valley Flower.a,b

Cymbidium Lucky Flower Stem Extract [INCI; of uncertain composition (see Schmidt 2017)], is a recognised cosmetic product ingredient purported to have hair conditioning properties (Standing Committee on Cosmetic Products 2019, CosIng 2023/4).



Cymbidium sinense (Andrews) Willd.
[syn. Epidendrum sinense Andrews]
Chinese Cymbidium, Chinese New Year Orchid

Cymbidium Sinense Extract [INCI; of uncertain composition (see Schmidt 2017)], is a recognised cosmetic product ingredient purported to have antioxidant, emollient, humectant, and skin conditioning properties (Standing Committee on Cosmetic Products 2019, CosIng 2023/4).



Cypripedium acaule Aiton
[syn. Fissipes acaulis (Aiton) Small]
Moccasin Flower, Pink Lady's Slipper, Pink Moccasin Flower

Nestler (1907) investigated the glandular secretions of the leaves of this species but found no substances that could irritate the skin.



Cypripedium calceolus L.
Lady's Slipper, Yellow Lady's Slipper Orchid, Echter Frauenschuh, Europäischer Frauenschuh, Gelber Frauenschuh

[Information available but not yet included in database]



Cypripedium parviflorum Salisb.
[syns Cypripedium bulbosum var. parviflorum (Salisb.) Farw., Cypripedium calceolus subsp. parviflorum (Salisb.) Hultén, Cypripedium calceolus var. parviflorum (Salisb.) Fernald, Cypripedium hirsutum var. parviflorum (Salisb.) Rolfe, Cypripedium luteum var. parviflorum (Salisb.) Raf.]
Northern Small-Flowered Yellow Ladyslipper

MacDougal (1895) observed that 6 of 9 subjects challenged with the leaves and stems of this species developed contact dermatitis. He reported also that tests repeated a year later produced a similar outcome. Nestler (1907) investigated the glandular secretions of the leaves of this species but found no substances that could irritate the skin.



Cypripedium parviflorum var. pubescens (Willd.) O.W.Knight
[syns Cypripedium bulbosum var. pubescens (Willd.) Farw., Cypripedium calceolus var. pubescens (Willd.) Correll, Cypripedium pubescens Willd.]
Large Yellow Lady's Slipper Orchid, Large Yellow Ladyslipper, Greater Yellow Lady's Slipper Orchid, Flatpetalled Ladyslipper, Golden Slipper, Mocassin Flower

White (1888), citing observations made by Professor Babcock (see Babcock 1875) noted that Cypripedium pubescens "is capable of producing as severe inflammation of the skin as Rhus Toxicodendron." Again, by reference to the observations made by Professor Babcock, Hurlbut (1889) explored the possibility of using homoeopathic dilutions of a cypripedium tincture (species not specified) as an oral antidote to poison oak dermatitis. MacDougal (1894), McNair (1923), and Pammel (1911) referred to and expanded upon the same observations made by Professor Babcock. MacDougal (1895) observed that 6 of 9 subjects challenged with the leaves and stems of Cypripedium pubescens developed contact dermatitis. He reported also that tests repeated a year later produced a similar outcome. By contrast, when Nestler (1907) investigated the glandular secretions of the leaves of Cypripedium pubescens, he found no substances that could irritate the skin.

Cypripedium Pubescens Extract [INCI; CAS RN 84775-54-2; of uncertain composition (see Schmidt 2017)]a, is a recognised cosmetic product ingredient purported to have skin conditioning and tonic properties (Standing Committee on Cosmetic Products 2019, CosIng 2023/4).



Cypripedium reginae Walter
[syns Cypripedium album Aiton, Cypripedium spectabile Salisb.]
Pink and White Lady Slipper, Pink Lady's Slipper, Queen's Lady's Slipper, Showy Lady's Slipper, White Lady's Slipper Orchid, Cypripède Royal

The pink lady's slipper was adopted as the official flower of the state of Minnesota, USA in 1902.a The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources notesb as a "Fun fact" that "Some people can get a rash from touching the leaves of this pretty orchid."

Perhaps the earliest report of an adverse reaction of the skin to contact with this orchid is that of Babcock (1875) who observed that "after gathering many specimens of Cypripedium spectabile, [his] hands were stained with the purplish secretion of the glandular hairs with which its stem and leaves are densely clothed, and shortly after experienced a peculiar irritation about [his] eyes. The next day [his] whole face presented the appearance of a severe case of Rhus poisoning." MacDougal (1894), also referring to Cypripedium spectabile, observed at first hand a severe dermatitis elicited by the leaves of this orchid when brushed against the arm. On further investigation he (MacDougal 1895) observed that 6 of 9 subjects challenged with the leaves and stems developed contact dermatitis. He reported also that tests repeated a year later produced a similar outcome. Schaffner (1903a) similarly noted that Cypripedium reginae is poisonous to the skin, much like poison ivy. Referring to Cypripedium hirsutum, Coulter (1904) described the outcome of challenge tests carried out in 22 subjects. Eleven of the subjects exhibited unpleasant effects from the mere handling of this species; a further six reacted only after rubbing of the plant on the skin; and five showed no reaction. Coulter (1904) also noted that he had seen numerous cases of dermatitis (which resembles that caused by poison ivy) attributable to this orchid and that it is most active during the flowering season, becoming practically innocuous after seed maturation. Also referring to Cypripedium spectabile, Nestler (1907) demonstrated that the overground parts of this species yield a skin-irritating secretion. Later, Nestler (1908) reported the results of more detailed studies into the skin-irritating activity of this species. More recently, Beierlein (1957) described a blistering allergic skin rash of the left hand, left arm, left shoulder, left armpit to the hip, and left knee, which he developed after carrying out hand pollination of Cypripedium reginae.



Cyrtopodium glutiniferum Raddi
[syn. Cyrtopodium cardiochilum Lindl.]
Glue-Carrying Cyrtopodium

In Brazilian traditional medicine, the juice and ointments prepared from the pseudobulbs of this and other species of Cyrtopodium R.Br. (but with poor or no distinction of the species utilised) are used to treat boils and abscesses and for wound healing (Araujo-Lima et al. 2020/21).

Cyrtopodium Cardiochilum Pseudobulb Extract [INCI; of uncertain composition (see Schmidt 2017)], is a recognised cosmetic product ingredient purported to have emollient, humectant, and skin conditioning properties (Standing Committee on Cosmetic Products 2019, CosIng 2023/4).



Cyrtopodium punctatum (L.) Lindl.
[syn. Epidendrum punctatum L.]
Cowhorn Orchid

Martínez & Barboza (2010) noted that the Tobas of Central Chaco in North-East Argentina wash with a decoction prepared from the leaves, or apply the leaves directly, in the treatment of boils and abscesses, but also believe that the plant is animated with a morbid spirit capable of producing furuncles intentionally if it is not gathered according to certain safety measures — a rag or a red tape has to be left as an offering.



Dactylorhiza maculata subsp. fuchsii (Druce) Hyl.
[syns Dactylorhiza fuchsii (Druce) Soó subsp. fuchsii, Orchis fuchsii Druce]
Common Spotted Orchid, Fuchs-Fingerwurz, Fuchs-Fingerknabenkraut

Dactylorhiza Fuchsii Extract [INCI; of uncertain composition (see Schmidt 2017)], is a recognised cosmetic product ingredient purported to have skin conditioning properties (Standing Committee on Cosmetic Products 2019, CosIng 2023/4).



Dactylorhiza maculata (L.) Soó subsp. maculata
[syn. Orchis maculata L.]
Heath Spotted Orchid, Geflecktes Knabenkraut

Orchis Maculata Flower Extract and Orchis Maculata Flower/Leaf/Stem Water [INCI; CAS RN 90082-23-8; both of uncertain composition (see Schmidt 2017)],a are recognised cosmetic product ingredients purported to have skin conditioning and fragrancing / perfuming properties respectively (Standing Committee on Cosmetic Products 2019, CosIng 2023/4).



Dendrobium bigibbum var. superbum Rchb.f.
[syns Dendrobium bigibbum var. phalaenopsis (Fitzg.) F.M.Bailey, Dendrobium phalaenopsis Fitzg.]
Cooktown Orchid

Dendrobium Phalaenopsis Flower Extract [INCI; of uncertain composition (see Schmidt 2017)], is a recognised cosmetic product ingredient purported to have skin conditioning properties (Standing Committee on Cosmetic Products 2019, CosIng 2023/4).



Dendrobium fimbriatum Hook.
[syn. Dendrobium normale Falc.]
Fringe Lipped Dendrobium

Dendrobium Fimbriatum Extract [INCI; of uncertain composition (see Schmidt 2017)], is a recognised cosmetic product ingredient purported to have antioxidant and skin protecting properties (Standing Committee on Cosmetic Products 2019, CosIng 2023/4).



Dendrobium loddigesii Rolfe
[syn. Dendrobium pulchellum G.Lodd. ex Paxton]
Loddiges' Dendrobium

Dendrobium Loddigesii Leaf/Stem Extract [INCI; of uncertain composition (see Schmidt 2017)], is a recognised cosmetic product ingredient purported to have emollient, humectant, skin conditioning, and skin protecting properties (Standing Committee on Cosmetic Products 2019, CosIng 2023/4).



Dendrobium moniliforme (L.) Sw.
[syns Dendrobium candidum Wall. ex Lindl., Epidendrum moniliforme L., Onychium japonicum Blume]
Japanese Stone Orchid

Dendrobium Candidum, Dendrobium Candidum Callus, Dendrobium Candidum Callus Extract, Dendrobium Candidum Callus Powder, Dendrobium Candidum Extract, Dendrobium Candidum Flower Extract, Dendrobium Candidum Powder, Dendrobium Candidum Stem Extract, Dendrobium Moniliforme Callus Culture Extract, Dendrobium Moniliforme Leaf/Stem Extract, and Onychium Japonicum Extract [INCI; all of uncertain composition (see Schmidt 2017)], are recognised cosmetic product ingredients purported variously to have antioxidant, bleaching, emollient, humectant, skin conditioning, and/or skin protecting properties (Standing Committee on Cosmetic Products 2019, CosIng 2023/4).

[Further information available but not yet included in database]



Dendrobium moschatum (Banks) Sw.
[syns Dendrobium calceolaria Carey ex Hook., Epidendrum moschatum Banks]
Musky-Smelling Dendrobium

Dendrobium Moschatum Flower Extract [INCI; of uncertain composition (see Schmidt 2017)], is a recognised cosmetic product ingredient purported to have skin conditioning properties (Standing Committee on Cosmetic Products 2019, CosIng 2023/4).



Dendrobium nobile Lindl.
[syn. Dendrobium lindleyanum Griff.]
Noble Dendrobium

Dendrobium Nobile Extract, Dendrobium Nobile Flower Extract, Dendrobium Nobile Protocorm Extract, Dendrobium Nobile Stem Extract, and Dendrobium Nobile/Phalaenopsis Amabilis Extract [INCI; all of uncertain composition (see Schmidt 2017)], are recognised cosmetic product ingredients purported to have emollient, skin conditioning, and skin protecting properties (Standing Committee on Cosmetic Products 2019, CosIng 2023/4).

[Further information available but not yet included in database]



Dendrobium officinale Kimura & Migo
[syns Dendrobium catenatum Lindl., Dendrobium huoshanense Z.Z.Tang & S.J.Cheng, Dendrobium stricklandianum Rchb.f., Dendrobium tosaense Makino]
Chained Dendrobium

Dendrobium Catenatum Leaf/Stem Extract and Dendrobium Huoshanense Leaf/Stem Extract [INCI; both of uncertain composition (see Schmidt 2017)], are recognised cosmetic product ingredients purported variously to have bleaching, skin conditioning, and skin protecting properties (Standing Committee on Cosmetic Products 2019, CosIng 2023/4).

[Further information available but not yet included in database]



Gastrodia elata Blume
[syn. Gastrodia viridis Makino]
Beautiful Gastrodia, Tall Gastrodia

Gastrodia Elata Flower Extract and Gastrodia Elata Root Extract [INCI; of uncertain composition (see Schmidt 2017)], are recognised cosmetic product ingredients purported to have skin conditioning properties (Standing Committee on Cosmetic Products 2019, CosIng 2023/4).

This non-chlorophyllous mycoheterotrophic orchid [= an orchid that obtains its energy and nutrients through a symbiotic relationship with a fungus, in this case the honey fungus Armillaria mellea (Vahl) P.Kumm., fam. Physalacriaceae; see Kusano (1911)] provides the traditional Chinese medicine known as tian ma (天麻) or Gastrodiae Rhizoma.a,b Its principal active compounds are considered to be gastrodin [= 4-(hydroxymethyl)phenyl β-D-glucopyranoside], vanillyl alcohol, vanillin, S-(4-hydroxybenzyl)-glutathione, and p-hydroxybenzaldehyde (Chen & Sheen 2011, Zhan et al. 2016).



Gavilea venosa (Lam.) Garay & Ormerod
[syns Asarca leucantha (Poepp.) Poepp. & Endl., Gavilea leucantha Poepp., Limodorum venosum Lam.]
Veined Gavilea, White Gavil

[Information available but not yet included in database]



Orchis mascula (L.) L.
[syn. Orchis morio var. mascula L.]
Early Purple Orchid, Männliches Knabenkraut, Männliche Orchis, Stattliches Knabenkraut

Orchis Mascula Extract and Orchis Mascula Flower Extract [INCI; CAS RN 90082-24-9; both of uncertain composition (see Schmidt 2017)],a are recognised cosmetic product ingredients purported to have hair and skin conditioning, and soothing properties respectively (Standing Committee on Cosmetic Products 2019, CosIng 2023/4).



Paphiopedilum × maudiae (Rolfe) McQuade
[syn. Cypripedium × maudiae Rolfe]
Lady Slipper Orchid, Venus Slipper Orchid

The hybrid formula of this artificial cross (grex) is Paphiopedilum callosum × Paphiopedilum lawrenceanum.a

Paphiopedilum Maudiae Flower Extract [INCI; of uncertain composition (see Schmidt 2017)], is a recognised cosmetic product ingredient purported to have skin conditioning properties (Standing Committee on Cosmetic Products 2019, CosIng 2023/4).



Phalaenopsis Blume
Moth Orchid

[Information available but not yet included in database]



Phalaenopsis amabilis (L.) Blume
[syn. Epidendrum amabile L.]
Mariposa Orchid, Moon Orchid, Moth Orchid

Phalaenopsis Amabilis Extract and Phalaenopsis Amabilis Flower Extract [INCI; both of uncertain composition (see Schmidt 2017)], are recognised cosmetic product ingredients purported to have humectant, and bleaching and skin protecting properties respectively (Standing Committee on Cosmetic Products 2019, CosIng 2023/4).



Phalaenopsis aphrodite Rchb.f.
[syn. Phalaenopsis amabilis Lindl.]
Aphrodite's Moth Orchid, Aphrodite's Phalaenopsis

Phalaenopsis Aphrodite Callus Extract [INCI; of uncertain composition (see Schmidt 2017)], is a recognised cosmetic product ingredient purported to have antioxidant, reducing, and skin protecting properties (Standing Committee on Cosmetic Products 2019, CosIng 2023/4).



Phalaenopsis Charm Sun Big Red Robe
[syn. Doritaenopsis Charm Sun Big Red Robe]
Moth Orchid
Phalaenopsis Charm Sun Big Red Robe is an orchid hybrid (grex) originated in 2008 from the cross Phalaenopsis Shiuh-Dong Lucky Girl × Phalaenopsis I-Hsin Cinderella.a,b

Phalaenopsis Charm Sun Big Red Robe Flower Extract [INCI; of uncertain composition (see Schmidt 2017)], is a recognised cosmetic product ingredient purported to have antimicrobial, antioxidant, skin conditioning, and skin protecting properties (Standing Committee on Cosmetic Products 2019, CosIng 2023/4).



Phalaenopsis lobbii (Rchb.f.) H.R.Sweet
[syn. Phalaenopsis parishii var. lobbii Rchb.f.]
Lobb's Moth Orchid

Phalaenopsis Lobbii Extract [INCI; of uncertain composition (see Schmidt 2017)], is a recognised cosmetic product ingredient purported to have bleaching properties (Standing Committee on Cosmetic Products 2019, CosIng 2023/4).



Phalaenopsis pulcherrima (Lindl.) J.J.Sm.
[syn. Doritis pulcherrima Lindl.]
Beautiful Moth Orchid

Phalaenopsis Pulcherrima Callus Powder and Phalaenopsis Pulcherrima Leaf Cell Extract [INCI; both of uncertain composition (see Schmidt 2017)], are recognised cosmetic product ingredients purported to have skin conditioning, antioxidant, and skin protecting properties (Standing Committee on Cosmetic Products 2019, CosIng 2023/4).



Phalaenopsis Sogo Yukidian
Moth Orchid
Phalaenopsis Sogo Yukidian is an orchid hybrid (grex) originated in 1998 from the cross Phalaenopsis Yukimai × Phalaenopsis Taisuco Kochdian.a

Phalaenopsis Sogo Yukidian Flower Extract and Phalaenopsis Sogo Yukidian Petal Extract [INCI; both of uncertain composition (see Schmidt 2017)], are recognised cosmetic product ingredients purported to have antioxidant and skin protecting properties (Standing Committee on Cosmetic Products 2019, CosIng 2023/4).



Phalaenopsis Sogo Yukidian 'Shiuh Dong Whiskey'
Moth Orchid
Phalaenopsis Sogo Yukidian is an orchid hybrid (grex) originated in 1998 from the cross Phalaenopsis Yukimai × Phalaenopsis Taisuco Kochdian.a

Phalaenopsis Shiuh-Dong Whishkey [sic] Flower Extract [INCI; of uncertain composition (see Schmidt 2017)], is a recognised cosmetic product ingredients purported to have antioxidant, skin conditioning, and skin protecting properties (Standing Committee on Cosmetic Products 2019, CosIng 2023/4).



Rhyncholaeliocattleya Marcella Koss
[syn. Brassocattleya Marcella Koss]
Brassocattleya Marcella Koss is an orchid hybrid (grex) originated in 1970 from the cross Cattleya Bob Betts × Rhyncholaeliocattleya Languedoc.a,b

Brassocattleya Marcella Koss Leaf/Stem Extract [INCI; of uncertain composition (see Schmidt 2017)], is a recognised cosmetic product ingredient purported to have bleaching, emollient, skin conditioning, and skin protecting properties (Standing Committee on Cosmetic Products 2019, CosIng 2023/4).

[Further information available but not yet included in database]



Vanda coerulea Griff. ex Lindl.
Autumn Lady's Tresses, Blue Orchid, Blue Vanda

Vanda Coerulea Extract and Vanda Coerulea Flower Extract [INCI; CAS RN 2242638-84-0; of uncertain composition (see Schmidt 2017)]a, are recognised cosmetic product ingredients purported to have antioxidant and skin conditioning properties respectively (Standing Committee on Cosmetic Products 2019, CosIng 2023/4).



Vanda falcata (Thunb.) Beer
[syns Neofinetia falcata (Thunb.) Hu, Orchis falcata Thunb.]
Japanese Wind Orchid, Samurai Orchid

Neofinetia Falcata Callus Culture Extract [INCI; of uncertain composition (see Schmidt 2017)], is a recognised cosmetic product ingredient purported to have skin protecting properties (Standing Committee on Cosmetic Products 2019, CosIng 2023/4).



Vanilla griffithii Rchb.f.

This plant, "common in the Malay Peninsula, contains a slightly milky latex, which when dropped on the hand or arm produces a very unpleasant irritation of the skin, as I know well by experience. […] This latex is used by native girls, mixed with oil to strengthen and thicken the hair, much as cantharides is used in Europe." (Ridley HN in Sprague 1921).



Vanilla phaeantha Rchb.f.
[syns Vanilla bahiana Hoehne, Vanilla gardneri Rolfe]
Bahia Vanilla, Leafy Vanilla

Vanilla Bahiana Fruit Extract [INCI; of uncertain composition (see Schmidt 2017)], is a recognised cosmetic product ingredient purported to have emollient and fragrancing properties (Standing Committee on Cosmetic Products 2019, CosIng 2023/4).



Vanilla planifolia Andrews
[syn. Vanilla fragrans Ames]
Bourbon Vanilla, Vanilla Orchid, Vanillier, Vanille

Workers who handled the pods developed dermatitis of the hands and face. The action of a mite or of cardol was suspected. Cardol derived from Anacardium, fam. Anacardiaceae was said to be applied to the pods to darken them (White 1887). Workers who clean, pack and sort the pods can develop dermatitis (Prosser White 1934, Downing 1939). Dermatitis from vanilla is known in the perfume and confectionery industries (Greenberg and Lester 1954, Schwartz et al. 1957).

Conjunctivitis and a partially generalized pustular eruption followed handling vanilla pods (Hiley 1909). A mould which covers the pods and chemicals applied to the pods have been suspected. Vanilla in a hair lotion produced dermatitis; the patient carried out a patch test to vanilla with a positive result (Leggett 1914).

Prosser White (1934) [incorrectly] cited Hutchinson (1892) as the source article in which the term "vanillaism" was coined; Maiden (1912) also referred to this condition. In an outbreak of contact dermatitis in workers with vanilla, 20% of those exposed were affected but they recovered in three weeks and were never troubled again; probably some transient contaminant was responsible (Gougerot and Basset 1939). Irritation occurring in persons who cut the vines was attributed to calcium oxalate crystals in the juice. A positive patch test to vanilla was observed in a sandwich maker who had contact dermatitis (Hjorth and Weismann 1972). Contact dermatitis from vanilla may present as erythema only, without eczematous changes (Sidi and Hincky 1964). Vanillin has sensitising properties and cross-sensitivity is observed with some constituents of balsam of Peru (from Myroxylon balsamum Harms, fam. Leguminosae) (Hjorth 1961). Eating vanilla caused a flare of eczema in a patient who was contact sensitive to the balsam (Pirila 1970). Vanilla and vanillin used in perfumery have caused dermatitis (Greenberg and Lester 1954).

Morton (1962a) noted that several individuals in Florida have acquired a stinging skin irritation, lasting several hours, after cutting back the vine, seemingly caused by crystals of calcium oxalate present in the plant sap. These crystals of calcium oxalate may also irritate the skin of workers harvesting vanilla pods. An individual who chewed a portion of the plant experienced an acute burning sensation in the mouth after a slight delay.

Vanilla Planifolia Flower Extract, Vanilla Planifolia Fruit, Vanilla Planifolia Fruit Extract, Vanilla Planifolia Fruit Oil, Vanilla Planifolia Fruit Water, Vanilla Planifolia Leaf Cell Extract, Vanilla Planifolia Seed, Vanilla Planifolia Seed Powder, and Vanilla Planifolia Tincture [INCI; CAS RN 8024-06-4, 84650-63-5, and 8047-24-3; all of uncertain composition (see Schmidt 2017)]a, are recognised cosmetic product ingredients purported variously to have abrasive, antioxidant, emollient, perfuming, skin conditioning, skin protecting, and smoothing properties (Standing Committee on Cosmetic Products 2019, CosIng 2023/4).



Vanilla × tahitensis J.W.Moore
[syn. Vanilla × hirsuta M.A.Clem. & D.L.Jones]
Tahitian Vanilla, Tahitivanille

Vanilla Tahitensis Fruit, Vanilla Tahitensis Fruit Extract, and Vanilla Tahitensis Seed [INCI; CAS RN 94167-14-3 and 8024-06-4; all of uncertain composition (see Schmidt 2017)]a, are recognised cosmetic product ingredients purported variously to have abrasive, fragrancing, and skin conditioning properties (Standing Committee on Cosmetic Products 2019, CosIng 2023/4).


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Richard J. Schmidt

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